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Archive for the ‘Development’ Category

Vacancy

Assistant/Associate Professor Development Studies / Political Ecology (Tenure Track)

We are looking for

The Sociology of Development and Change Group (SDC) at Wageningen University seeks a candidate for an Assistant Professor or Associate Professor in development studies / political ecology. Candidates with a background in relevant social sciences (anthropology, geography, sociology, political science, etc.) will be considered, especially candidates with expertise in the broad areas of environment and development, political ecology, natural resources management and conservation. Experience with interdisciplinary research, methodology and critical (development) theory will be an advantage. Your responsibilities include performing research within our domain, developing and teaching courses at undergraduate and graduate levels, and participating in management activities. You are also expected to generate external financial support for an innovative research agenda.

We ask

As an Assistant or Associate Professor in development studies / political ecology you have: – a PhD in anthropology, sociology, geography, or a related field; – proven ability to publish in high-quality academic journals and with top academic publishers; – ability to work in interdisciplinary and international research teams; – excellent communication and writing skills; – good didactic qualities and enthusiasm for teaching and working with students; – commitment to learn Dutch (for non-Dutch speaking candidates) within 2 years of appointment.

We offer

We offer talented scientists a challenging career trajectory called Tenure Track. From the position of Assistant or Associate Professor you can grow into a Professor holding a Personal Chair. Training and coaching are provided and interdisciplinary (international) cooperation is stimulated. As we will only be selecting outstanding candidates to take part in Tenure Track, this will be a good stepping stone to a further academic career within Wageningen UR or elsewhere. You will be given the opportunity to develop your own research line. We offer a temporary contract for 38 hours per week, with the possibility of extension, which can lead to a permanent employment contract. Gross Salary: for Assistant Professors from € 3.342 to € 5.171 per month and for Associate Professors from € 4.607 to € 6.160 per month based on full time employment and depending on expertise and experience. In addition we offer an attractive benefits package with additional holiday (8%) and end- of-year bonuses (8.3 %), the ABP Pension scheme and training and career development. Our individual choices model gives you some freedom to assemble your own set of terms and conditions.

More information

Additional information about the vacancy can be obtained from: Prof.dr. Bram Büscher  (bram.buscher AT wur.nl or +31 317 48 2015 or +31 317 48 4507) Deadline for application: 5 July 2015. Please note that interviews are planned in the week of 14-18 July 2015

We are

Wageningen University and Research Centre

Delivering a substantial contribution to the quality of life. That’s our focus – each and every day. Within our domain, healthy food and living environment, we search for answers to issues affecting society – such as sustainable food production, climate change and alternative energy. Of course, we don’t do this alone. Every day, 6,500 people work on ‘the quality of life’, turning ideas into reality, on a global scale. Could you be one of these people? We give you the space you need.

The Sociology of Development and Change Group (SDC)

SDC focuses on the structures and practices of development and change with a particular scientific interest in inequality, marginalization and political agency. The group’s vision is to be a world-leading, politically engaged and interdisciplinary research and educational centre in development studies, political ecology, anthropology of law and crisis and disaster studies. Our mission is to gain and communicate a deeper understanding of inequality and marginalisation generated by global and local structures of power and political-economy and so contribute to social and environmental justice. At the same time we study how actors generate forms of agency and practices that enable them to deal with these dynamics and create new opportunities. For further information about working at Wageningen UR, take a look at http://www.wageningenur.nl/en/Jobs.htm

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Interesting conference organised by my colleagues at the ISS:

The Political Economy of the Extractive Imperative in Latin America: Reducing poverty and inequality vs. ensuring inclusion and sustainability?

10 April 2015
International Institute of Social Studies (ISS)
The Hague
The Netherlands

Confirmed speakers include:

José Antonio Ocampo (Columbia)
Jean Grugel (Sheffield)
Laura Rival (Oxford)
Alfredo Saad Filho (SOAS)
Eduardo Silva (Tulane)
Rob Vos (FAO)
Carlos Zorilla (DECOIN)

International Institute of Social Studies (ISS) and Centre for Latin American Research and Documentation (CEDLA) invite paper submission for the upcoming international meeting on ‘The Political Economy of the Extractive Imperative in Latin America: Reducing poverty and inequality vs. ensuring inclusion and sustainability?’ Our aim is to bring together scholars working in various disciplines and traditions to critically reflect on the changes taking place in Latin America. Interested participants should send a 250-word abstract, paper title, full address and brief bio toeximperative@gmail.com by 1 December 2014.
Conference fee is 50 euros. Waivers are available for eligible scholars (PhD students, participants from developing countries, etc.).
Organizing team: Murat Arsel (ISS), Barbara Hogenboom (CEDLA), Lorenzo Pellegrini (ISS)
http://www.iss.nl/extractiveimperative

One of the prominent features of contemporary development politics and policies in Latin America is the prominent role of the state in directing and powering economic development. Accompanying increased state presence in economy and society, another consensus envisions the intensification of natural resource extraction as crucial for development. This extractivist drive is especially pronounced in the countries characterizing the ‘turn to the left’, which have at the same time played host to alternative development approaches, be it the concept of ‘buen vivir/vivir bien’ or the granting of constitutional rights to nature. While Venezuela, Bolivia, and Ecuador have become emblematic of these processes, their impact can be felt across much of the region.
This convergence between state prominence and intensified extraction has emerged within a particular context in which the electoral successes of the leaders in power have been underwritten by promises to eradicate what has been seen as the two cardinal sins of neoliberal policies: persistent poverty and societal inequality. Eschewing aggressive redistribution policies, these states have instead sought to achieve rapid, poverty-reducing growth accompanied with largely expanded expenditure for social policies.
An ‘extractive imperative’ was thus borne as natural resource extraction came to be seen simultaneously as source of income and employment generation (through investment in extractive facilities, infrastructure, etc.) but also of financing for increased social policy expenditure. According to this imperative, extraction needs to continue and expand regardless of prevailing circumstances (be it low/high prices of commodities, protests of indigenous groups, or environmental concerns), with the state playing a leading role in facilitating the process and capturing a large share of the ensuing revenues.
A vibrant debate has since emerged regarding the best way to characterize these attempts, with some commentators hailing the birth of a post-neoliberal paradigm and others asserting that we are witnessing reconstituted neoliberalism. Various continuing or new dynamics – such as increased investment from China and other forms of ‘South-South’ flows – further complicate the overall picture. This workshop aims to move beyond facile dichotomies to address the political economy of the ‘extractive imperative’ and the tensions it increasingly generates in Latin America. Specifically, the workshop will engage with these broad sets of questions:
·    How effective have these states been in reducing poverty and inequality? How important is the role of extractive industries in their growth performance and in financing social policies? How durable are these policies within the context of fluctuating commodity prices?
·    What role do environmental NGOs and activists, who were early supporters of the leaders promising an enhanced role for the state in socioeconomic development, play in this new era? What are the implications for democratic politics of the increased criminalization of environmental activism?

·    Where do indigenous and other marginalized communities fit within this political sphere that is dominated by the state and its extractivist imperative? What are the potential cleavages between national poverty reduction strategies and the manifestation of their local impacts? Can meaningful and painstakingly gained indigenous rights –including socio-political inclusion, territorial integrity and the pursuit of alternative approaches to development and well-being – be fostered within the current conjuncture?

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My book, ‘Transforming the Frontier. Peace Parks and the Politics of Neoliberal Conservation in Southern Africa’ is out now with Duke University Press. Go to the book page or click on the below picture to find out how to get your hands on a copy!

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International Institute of Social Studies (The Hague) of Erasmus University Rotterdam

 

The International Institute of Social Studies (ISS) is a leading academic centre for international development studies, and a University Institute of Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR). It is one of the oldest institutes in this field, having been established in 1952 by Dutch universities and the Netherlands Ministry of Education as a postgraduate institute for research, education and capacity building. The institute offers a PhD in Development Studies, a 15.5-month MA in Development studies with five Majors, and several post-graduate Diploma courses. Students come from over 50-60 countries.

The Staff Group Rural Development, Environment and Population Studies has a vacancy (1.0 FTE) for a Postdoctoral researcher (18 months) in the field of:

Agrarian and Environmental Studies (AES)

The Staff Group is engaged in research, teaching, advisory work and institutional capacity building in international development studies. It has recently formed a research program (RP), “Political Economy of Resources, Environment and Population”, which included the research areas of agrarian and environmental studies.

 

Profile:

 

The successful candidate is expected to bring innovative research capacity to the ISS in the field of Agrarian and Environmental Studies, complementing and/or extending our work, among others, on environmental conservation, natural resource conflicts, and land grabs. The specific objective of the appointment is for a recently graduated (or soon to graduate) PhD to publish results from previous research, initiate new research, and contribute to the formulation and writing of research (grant) proposals (0.8 FTE), and to develop teaching experience that will enable her/him to make the transition from PhD researcher to an academic professional (0.2 FTE). Thematically, these activities will be focused on the broad areas of critical Agrarian and Environmental Studies, but the ideal candidate should have experience and be willing to conduct research in the specific areas of environmental conservation, political ecology and natural resource use and management from a critical political economy perspective.

 

Requirements:

  • A recently or nearly completed PhD in the social sciences (geography, anthropology, political science, sociology, etc.);
  • Evidence of publication capacity, including an emerging publications track record and clear research and publications plans;
  • Modest teaching experience, preferably at post-graduate level;
  • Teaching/research experience in the Global South;
  • Ability to work in an inter-disciplinary and international team;
  • Willingness to travel and conduct research abroad.

While open to all regional specializations, preference will be given to candidates with research interests in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Tasks and Responsibilities:

 

Recruitment will be made for an appointment of 1.5 years. A starting date between July-August 2013 is anticipated. Besides the detailed profile given above, the position involves the following tasks and responsibilities:

  • Publish high-quality articles and chapters;
  • Assist members of the research group with the writing and submission of research grants and externally financed research programs;
  • Undertake new research and (co-) publish on issues relevant to the AES programme, preferably focused on, but not limited to, Dr. Bram Büscher’s ongoing research on environmental conservation (see www.brambuscher.com for more information);
  • Contribute to the teaching of the Major “Agrarian and Environmental Studies”.

Appointment: ISS/EUR will offer a fixed temporary contract of 1.5 years. The appointment is envisaged at Postdoctoral level (scale 10 CAO NU).

Employment conditions: In accordance with those applied at the Erasmus University Rotterdam and indicated in the Collective Labour Agreement (CAO NU) of the Dutch universities. Salary being dependent on the candidate’s experience ranges from € 2403,- to
€ 3793,- gross per month under full-time contract. In addition, ISS pays an 8% holiday allowance and an end-of-year payment which is for 2013: 8,3 %.

Applications and more information: Applications, accompanied by a detailed Curriculum Vitae and the names of three Referees, should be addressed to the Personnel Office (Ms. Sabine Zebel), International Institute of Social Studies, P.O. Box 29776, 2502LT, The Hague, The Netherlands, preferably send in electronic form directed to vacancy AT iss.nl, before the 15th of May 2013. With equal qualifications preference will be given to a woman. Short-listed candidates will be requested to supply samples of published output and at that stage their referees will be contacted. More information about the vacancy can be obtained from Dr. Bram Büscher, Associate Professor of Environment and Sustainable Development, buscher AT iss.nl, or Dr. Max Spoor, Professor of Development Studies and Chair of the Staff Group and the Research Programme (spoor AT iss.nl).

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I have recently become part of the editorial team of the interdisciplinary, open access journal Conservation & Society. I am very excited about being able to contribute to this cutting-edge journal, and so help stimulate high-quality research on contemporary conservation-society issues. For more information, see the website: http://conservationandsociety.org/. To all academic colleagues and friends: do consider submitting a paper!

Conservation and Society

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Development and Change Forum 2012 (with a Debate section on Nature™ Inc.) is out!

See: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dech.2012.43.issue-1/issuetoc  or go to the publications page to download the introduction to the debate section.

 

Edited by Murat Arsel and Bram Büscher

 

Focus

Post-neoliberalism in Latin America: Rebuilding and Reclaiming the State after Crisis (pages 1–21)

Jean Grugel and Pía Riggirozzi

Fight or Acquiesce? Religion and Political Process in Turkey’s and Egypt’s Neoliberalizations (pages 23–51)

Cihan Tuğal

Debate: Nature™ Inc.

Nature™ Inc.: Changes and Continuities in Neoliberal Conservation and Market-based Environmental Policy (pages 53–78)

Murat Arsel and Bram Büscher

What’s Nature Got To Do With It? A Situated Historical Perspective on Socio-natural Commodities (pages 79–104)

Nancy Lee Peluso

The Contradictory Logic of Global Ecosystem Services Markets (pages 105–131)

Kathleen McAfee

Market Masquerades: Uncovering the Politics of Community-level Payments for Environmental Services in Cambodia (pages 133–158)

Sarah Milne and Bill Adams

‘TEEB Begins Now’: A Virtual Moment in the Production of Natural Capital (pages 159–184)

Kenneth Iain MacDonald and Catherine Corson

Biodiversity for Billionaires: Capitalism, Conservation and the Role of Philanthropy in Saving/Selling Nature (pages 185–203)

George Holmes

Consuming the Forest in an Environment of Crisis: Nature Tourism, Forest Conservation and Neoliberal Agriculture in South India (pages 205–227)

Daniel Münster and Ursula Münster

The Tragedy of the Commodity and the Farce of AquAdvantage Salmon® (pages 229–251)

Rebecca Clausen and Stefano B. Longo

Geoengineering: Re-making Climate for Profit or Humanitarian Intervention? (pages 253–270)

Holly Jean Buck

How do Investors Value Environmental Harm/Care? Private Equity Funds, Development Finance Institutions and the Partial Financialization of Nature-based Industries (pages 271–293)

Sarah Bracking

Using the Master’s Tools? Neoliberal Conservation and the Evasion of Inequality (pages 295–317)

Robert Fletcher

Legacy

Fred Halliday: Engagements, Languages, Myths and Solidarities (pages 319–339)

David Styan

Reflections

Joan Martinez-Alier (pages 341–359)

Lorenzo Pellegrini

Çağlar Keyder (pages 361–373)

Tuna Kuyucu

Assessments

Preempting Possibility: Critical Assessment of the IEA’s World Energy Outlook 2010 (pages 375–393)

Mazen Labban

Power Inequalities in Explaining the Link between Natural Hazards and Unnatural Disasters (pages 395–407)

Fikret Adaman

A Radically Conservative Vision? The Challenge of UNEP’s Towards a Green Economy (pages 409–422)

Dan Brockington

World Development Report 2012: Gender Equality and Development— A Commentary (pages 423–437)

Shahra Razavi

Poverty Alleviation and Smallholder Agriculture: The Rural Poverty Report 2011 (pages 439–448)

Jan Douwe van der Ploeg

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AT the ISS we have a vacancy for Postdoctoral researcher “Agrarian and Environmental Change” (1.0 FTE), for a period of 2.5 years (30 Months).

The Blurb: the successful candidate is expected to bring innovative research capacity to the ISS in the field of Agrarian and Environmental Studies, complementing and/or extending our work, among others, on environmental conservation, natural resource conflicts, and land grabs. The specific objective of the appointment is for a recently graduated (or soon to graduate) PhD to publish results from previous research, initiate new research, and contribute to the formulation and writing of research (grant) proposals (0.8 FTE), and to develop teaching experience that will enable her/him to make the transition from PhD researcher to an academic professional (0.2 FTE). Thematically, these activities will be focused on the broad areas of critical Agrarian and Environmental Studies, but the ideal candidate should have experience and be willing to conduct research in the specific areas of environmental conservation, political ecology and natural resource use and management from a critical political economy perspective.

For more information, please see the ISS website, or send me an email (buscher AT iss DOT nl)!

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